Mpongwe youth resetlement project challenges

Status: In progress
Time needed: 
Two weeks or more
Step: 
3

Youth from Daff Society has finally been trained in business planing and proposal writing and 10 of our member acquired a piece of land 5 hactares each and a house built already by the Ministry of Sport Youth and Child Development in Mpongwe.
1. Introduction
Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) if well planned and harnessed have the ability to bridge the digital divide and accelerate the rate of growth of economic groups that have traditionally been marginalized. They enhance accuracy and efficiency in work output at all levels of production in not only agricultural fields but also in all rural developmental strategies. Furthermore, they have the potential to provide effective collaboration among practitioners engaged in similar practices for exchange of ideas, experiences, challenges, knowledge sharing which broadens practitioner’s knowledge base and consequently improves work output.
The Copperbelt Province of Zambia has in the recent last two decades experienced an increase in a lot of people taking up agriculture as the main source of living and business. The Government of the Republic of Zambia has put up policies and strategies aimed at enhancing access to agricultural land, inputs, livestock and training to the locals through The Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives. Lately, the Ministry of Sport, Youth and Child Development in collaboration with the Land Resettlement Scheme under the Vice President’s office and the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives has combined efforts in equipping youths with agricultural land, inputs/livestock and in some areas little start up capital. This programme aims at providing sustainable livelihood initiatives to youths since most youths in Zambia are not in formal employment or education. This programme has resulted in many youths acquiring land, inputs and training from various parts of Zambia such as Lukanga North Youth Resettlement Scheme on the Copperbelt Province. However, the main challenge faced by these youths is little or limited market exposure of agricultural products. Young farmers have very poor methods of advertisement and marketing for their produce. Owing to this challenge, they are exploited by the few buyers that buy their products as they dictate the price at which to buy from them.
2. Overview of Initiative
In order to address the marketing/advertisement challenge faced by most farmers especially the young person, a tool that could be used to expose specific agricultural products produced by particular youths including contact details to a variety of buyers could be developed. This tool can provide both audio and visual information and would be developed by using Free and Open Source Software such as Dreamweaver and easy Php for web designing, MySQL for databases and Wikipedia for blogs and wikis. This tool is a listing website that can be designed specifically for the marketing of agricultural products for young farmers.
4. Specific Objectives of the Initiative

• Market and Advertise Agricultural products and services for young farmers
• Provide a link between agricultural participants and the users
• Inform users about the type of agricultural products available in a particular area
• Enhance competition among farmers
• Create a standard for marketing prices for agricultural products
• Save people’s time in looking for agricultural products
• Expose various agricultural activities practiced in Zambia
5. Implementation of the Initiative
In order to obtain the database needed to be on the site, a simple structured form would be designed and deployed to be filled in by the young farmers on the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. The form would be designed in such a way that it furnishes the information required to be uploaded on the ‘Find the Young Farmer’ website which would include among other things the name of the farming business, contact person and address, type and category of agricultural products available etc. After the form is filled in, a digital/video camera would be used to capture photos and videos of the particular farmer including the agricultural products that are produced by the farmer for sale. These farmers would be encouraged to get trained in basic ICT literacy to allow them navigate the internet. The information obtained is used to create farmer profiles.
The website can be marketed to all government ministries and departments, telecentres, organizations and also on in the local press and media. By making the site popular, the farmer’s product gets to be marketed and advertised.
6. Sustainability
In order to run and manage the site, there is need to obtain very good bandwidth. Costs required to pay the hosting Internet Service Provider and any other initiatives made towards enhancing marketing of the products and administration would be realized by making the farmers pay for space. However, this is only possible after the participating young farmers actually realize the benefit of advertising the goods on ‘Find the Young Farmer’ website.
7. Conclusion
With the implementation of the ‘Find the Young Farmer’ listing website, farmers would have their agricultural products highly advertised and consequently marketed. The farmers would reach out to a variety of customers for their products. Users of the website would save time on looking for farmers having a particular product that they need. It should be noted here that the design, deployment and implementation of the ‘Find the Young Farmer’ website involves the use of ICTs in order to improve access to market for agriculture products from young farmers on the Copperbelt Province
Report by
Patrick chabu
Daff Society Project Coordinator

Patrick

Picture: 
Copy of Image042.jpg
Image010.jpg
DSC03424.JPG
DSC03327.JPG
DSC03431.JPG
DSC03422.JPG
DSC03399.JPG
DSC03359.JPG
DSC03427.JPG
DSC03375.JPG
DSC03424.JPG
DSC03422.JPG
stdClass Object ( [nid] => 322939 [vid] => 327989 [type] => task_discussion [status] => 1 [created] => 1315590491 [changed] => 1315590491 [comment] => 0 [promote] => 1 [sticky] => 0 [revision_timestamp] => 1315590491 [title] => farming [body] => Here is how to farm your land. Would you like a dvd? Ken GARDENS/MINI-FARMS NETWORK Wrokshops: USA - TX, MS, FL, CA, AR, NM; Mexico, Rep. Dominicana, Côté d’Ivoire, Nigeria, Nicaragua, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Haiti, England, India, Uzbekistan, South Africa minifarms@gmail.com Workshops in organic, no-till, permanent bed gardening, mini-farming and mini-livestock farming, using bucket drip irrigation, worldwide, in English & Español Organic, No-till Farming The solution to world hunger is teaching the farmers to farm profitably and sell locally. There is a grassroots movement, around the world, for families and groups to produce their own food due to cost, flavor and chemical contamination. "There's this belief that in order to stop poverty, we have to find ways to get people to stop being farmers. What we need to do is find ways to stop them from being poor farmers." Amy Smith, MIT This can feed the world regardless of how high the population goes. The demand for local, organic, fresh food is unlimited in most countries in the world. The following will do that! These are based on the internet, US & international agriculture magazines, experiences teaching agriculture in many countries, research data and farmer experiences in those countries and a demonstration garden. They are ecologically sustainable, environmentally responsible, socially just and economically viable. Organic, no-till farming, in permanent beds, using only a machete/corn knife/weed knife, doubles or triples yields compared to traditional ways, reduces labor 50% to 75%, reduces inputs/expenses to nearly 0 [buy only seed for new crops and green manure/cover crops], increases fertility, stops soil erosion [no rain water runoff], eliminates most weed, disease and insect problems and greatly increases profits if marketing. Use DIY drip or DIY bucket drip irrigation [made by farmer] to produce during the dry season and in areas of low rainfall. These practices stopped the migration of farm families to the cities. [Honduras]. The majority of the food in develop-ing countries is produced by women farmers. They need help. There is unlimited, documented proof. There are 105,000,000 no-till hectares worldwide. Fukaoka Farm, Japan, has been no-till [rice, small grains, vegetables] for 70 years. At the time of my visits, an Indian farmer has been no-till [vegetables] for 5 years, a Malawi farmer has been no-till [vegetables] on permanent beds for 25 years and a Honduras farmer has been no-till [vegetables & fruit] on permanent beds on the contour (73° slope] for 8 years. Ruth Stout [USA] had a no-till garden for 30 years and 7,000 people visited her garden. I have been on farms where the farmer, alone, farms 10 acres [4 hectares], using only a machete [bush knife/corn knife]. No technique yet devised by man has been anywhere near as effective at halting soil erosion and making food production truly sustainable as 0-tillage (Baker) 1. Maintain healthy soil. Healthy soil produces healthy crops with highest yields and prevents most disease, pest, weed and erosion problems. 2. Increase the soil’s organic matter every year. 3. Little or no external inputs [It is not necessary to buy anything, from anybody except seed.] 4. Leave crop residue on top of soil. No burning and never make biochar. You are burning up fertilizer. Do not plow it into the soil. 5. Plant green manure/cover crops to increase the soil organic matter. No alley cropping; hedgerows. 6. Plant the new crop in the crop residue by opening up a row or a place for the seed. 7. Plant every field every year [no fallow land] 8. 0-tillage: no plowing, no digging, no culti-vating. No hard physical labor required so children and the elderly can farm easily. Farmers farm ten acres alone using hand tools only [Honduras] 9. Tree crops: fruit, nuts, coffee [shade-grown], etc. Use perennial cover crops 10. Permanent paths [walking] 11. Permanent beds. They were used 2000 BC in Guatemala, Mexico and many other countries. 15-25% of the land is in paths and that saves 15-25% of the seed, water and labor but yields will be higher. [No alley cropping] 12. Hand tools: machete/corn knife, weed cutter, seeding hoe. Local blacksmith should make them. 13. Soil always covered [cover crop or mulch]. 14. Intercropping/rotation with legumes 15. Compost: Use the organic matter for mulch. If there is an excess, pile it up and use later. 16. SRI - system of rice intensification. Double yields, reduces water requirements by 50% and reduces labor. 17. SRI for other crops: sugar cane, finger millet, cotton, wheat, mustard, maize, teff, pulses, vegetables. 18. Muscovies for insect control, meat, eggs; goats for meat and milk. 19. Bucket drip irrigation should be used during the dry season and in areas of low rainfall: Imported bucket drip kits are US$25 in most countries. A bucket drip line can be made locally from poly tubing [US$3, Nicaragua]. One will irrigate a row of crops 33 meters long using only 20 liters of water per day. A dripline can be moved to irrigate several rows per day. Water can be from a stream, pond or well. A drip kit returns US$20 per month to the farmer [FAO study]. A. ecopreservationsociety.org/site/index.php/the-news/sustainability/237--whats-wrong-with-our-food-system-ted-talk-by-birke-baehr [Subtitled in many languages] I volunteer my time to teach workshops, worldwide, in English or Spanish. All expenses must be paid. Scheduled: Philippines. Ken Hargesheimer minifarms@gmail.com When Soil is Plowed Dr. Elaine Ingham, describes an undisturbed grassland—where a wide diversity of plants grow, their roots mingling with a wide diversity of soil organisms—and how it changes when it is plowed. A typical teaspoon of native grassland soil contains between 600 million and 800 million individual bacteria that are members of perhaps 10,000 species. Several miles of fungi are in that teaspoon of soil, as well as 10,000 individual protozoa. There are 20 to 30 beneficial nematodes from as many as 100 species. Root-feeding nematodes are quite scarce in truly healthy soils. They are present, but in numbers so low that it is rare to find them. After only one plowing, a few species of bacteria and fungi disappear because the food they need is no longer put back in the system. But for the most part, all the suppressive organisms, all the nutrient cyclers, all the decomposers, all the soil organisms that rebuild good soil structure are still present and trying to do their jobs. But tillage continues to deplete soil organic matter and kill fungi. The larger predators are crushed, their homes destroyed. The bacteria go through a bloom and blow off huge amounts of that savings-account organic matter. With continued tillage, the "policemen" (organisms) that compete with and inhibit disease are lost. The "architects" that build soil aggregates are lost. So are the "engineers"—the larger organisms that design and form the larger pores in soil. The predators that keep bacteria, fungi, and root-feeding organisms in check are lost. Disease suppression declines, soil structure erodes, and water infiltration decreases because mineral crusts form. Dr. Elaine Ingham, soilfoodweb.com "Plowing the land over and over damages the soil almost as much as chemical weed killers do. It kills off nitrogen-fixing bacteria." Onmivore's Dilemma Plow to kill the weeds; that brings to the surface more seeds to sprout; more weeds to plow up. Dear Ken, Thank you for all the info. I am applying it in my own vegetable patch. It is working. Got half a pocket of potatoes off a square metre. So would imagine about 10 pounds per square yard. This off previously dead low, carbon soil. Sure next crop will be better. Got yams coming up on same spot already. Want to plant herbs and spices. I will send photos. Your advise is so simple. People do not believe me when I tell them. I am so excited about growing things now. This coming from a commercial plum farmer. May you be blessed this holy season a thousand times more than you blessed me with you help. Jeremy Karsen, middagkrans@mwebbiz.co.za We have already started several gardens in Jinkfuin community and the people working on them have benefitted from the DVDS we received from Ken. We watched the DVDs and got so many lessons and there women and men already running gardens, good ones! Lia, Kimilili I confirm Ken's advice. I've been using mulch and no-till since the late sixties. It works. It really works. I now manage a 5,000 ft² community garden in its fifth season. It started on hard clay with turf grass using cardboard and mulch. Leaves are added to the beds every fall and it has never been tilled. It's a beautiful, fruitful garden. I have friends who have sand and advised them to do the same. They've been very successful as well. It will work anywhere. Judith Hainaut Project room: Kyomya, Uganda We have been working on improving farming techniques for almost a year. Unfortunately, the farmers are planting small plots of land that only feed their family. There is no other choice but to try new techniques to improve the output of their plot. Ken Hargesheimer suggested the "no till" farming techniques as well as the "drip system". Both have proven effective at increasing production by at least 5 fold. The time is now for Kyomya to become a model agricultural village. [nabuur.com] Ken has instructed us that by introducing cover crops we will improve the organic nature of the soil. This involves less work than the previous method and has resulted in double the yield from crops where this method has been implemented.’ Busukuma, naburr.com [teaser] => Here is how to farm your land. Would you like a dvd? Ken GARDENS/MINI-FARMS NETWORK Wrokshops: USA - TX, MS, FL, CA, AR, NM; Mexico, Rep. Dominicana, Côté d’Ivoire, Nigeria, Nicaragua, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Haiti, England, India, Uzbekistan, South Africa minifarms@gmail.com Workshops in organic, no-till, permanent bed gardening, mini-farming and mini-livestock farming, using bucket drip irrigation, worldwide, in English & Español Organic, No-till Farming [log] => [format] => 1 [uid] => 5266 [name] => minifarms [picture] => [data] => a:6:{s:16:"nodecomment_sort";s:1:"1";s:16:"privatemsg_allow";i:1;s:28:"privatemsg_setmessage_notify";i:0;s:8:"og_email";s:1:"2";s:17:"messaging_default";s:4:"mail";s:7:"contact";i:0;} [path] => village/choshi/project/task/discussion/farming [field_embedded_video] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [embed] => [value] => [provider] => [data] => Array ( ) ) ) [field_external_link] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [url] => [title] => [attributes] => N; ) [1] => Array ( [url] => [title] => [attributes] => N; ) ) [comment_type] => task_discussion [og_groups] => Array ( [0] => 213852 ) [og_groups_both] => Array ( [213852] => Lukanga North Resetlement ) [og_public] => 1 [tags] => [nodewords] => Array ( ) [trid] => 0 [language] => en [i18n_status] => 0 [taxonomy] => Array ( ) [translation] => Array ( ) [cid] => 322939 [pid] => 0 [hostname] => [thread] => 01/ [mail] => [homepage] => [comment_target_nid] => 322904 [depth] => 0 )

Here is how to farm your land. Would you like a dvd? Ken

GARDENS/MINI-FARMS NETWORK
Wrokshops: USA - TX, MS, FL, CA, AR, NM; Mexico, Rep. Dominicana, Côté d’Ivoire, Nigeria,
Nicaragua, Honduras, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Haiti, England, India, Uzbekistan, South Africa
minifarms@gmail.com
Workshops in organic, no-till, permanent bed gardening, mini-farming and mini-livestock farming,
using bucket drip irrigation, worldwide, in English & Español

Organic, No-till Farming

The solution to world hunger is teaching the farmers to farm profitably and sell locally. There is a grassroots movement, around the world, for families and groups to produce their own food due to cost, flavor and chemical contamination. "There's this belief that in order to stop poverty, we have to find ways to get people to stop being farmers. What we need to do is find ways to stop them from being poor farmers." Amy Smith, MIT This can feed the world regardless of how high the population goes. The demand for local, organic, fresh food is unlimited in most countries in the world.

The following will do that! These are based on the internet, US & international agriculture magazines, experiences teaching agriculture in many countries, research data and farmer experiences in those countries and a demonstration garden. They are ecologically sustainable, environmentally responsible, socially just and economically viable.

Organic, no-till farming, in permanent beds, using only a machete/corn knife/weed knife, doubles or triples yields compared to traditional ways, reduces labor 50% to 75%, reduces inputs/expenses to nearly 0 [buy only seed for new crops and green manure/cover crops], increases fertility, stops soil erosion [no rain water runoff], eliminates most weed, disease and insect problems and greatly increases profits if marketing. Use DIY drip or DIY bucket drip irrigation [made by farmer] to produce during the dry season and in areas of low rainfall.

These practices stopped the migration of farm families to the cities. [Honduras]. The majority of the food in develop-ing countries is produced by women farmers. They need help. There is unlimited, documented proof. There are 105,000,000 no-till hectares worldwide.

Fukaoka Farm, Japan, has been no-till [rice, small grains, vegetables] for 70 years. At the time of my visits, an Indian farmer has been no-till [vegetables] for 5 years, a Malawi farmer has been no-till [vegetables] on permanent beds for 25 years and a Honduras farmer has been no-till [vegetables & fruit] on permanent beds on the contour (73° slope] for 8 years. Ruth Stout [USA] had a no-till garden for 30 years and 7,000 people visited her garden. I have been on farms where the farmer, alone, farms 10 acres [4 hectares], using only a machete [bush knife/corn knife].

No technique yet devised by man has been anywhere near as effective at halting soil erosion and making food production truly sustainable as 0-tillage (Baker)

1. Maintain healthy soil. Healthy soil produces healthy crops with highest yields and prevents most disease, pest, weed and erosion problems.
2. Increase the soil’s organic matter every year.
3. Little or no external inputs [It is not necessary to buy anything, from anybody except seed.]
4. Leave crop residue on top of soil. No burning and never make biochar. You are burning up fertilizer. Do not plow it into the soil.
5. Plant green manure/cover crops to increase the soil organic matter. No alley cropping; hedgerows.
6. Plant the new crop in the crop residue by opening up a row or a place for the seed.
7. Plant every field every year [no fallow land]
8. 0-tillage: no plowing, no digging, no culti-vating. No hard physical labor required so children and the elderly can farm easily. Farmers farm ten acres alone using hand tools only [Honduras]
9. Tree crops: fruit, nuts, coffee [shade-grown], etc. Use perennial cover crops
10. Permanent paths [walking]
11. Permanent beds. They were used 2000 BC in Guatemala, Mexico and many other countries. 15-25% of the land is in paths and that saves 15-25% of the seed, water and labor but yields will be higher. [No alley cropping]
12. Hand tools: machete/corn knife, weed cutter, seeding hoe. Local blacksmith should make them.
13. Soil always covered [cover crop or mulch].
14. Intercropping/rotation with legumes
15. Compost: Use the organic matter for mulch. If there is an excess, pile it up and use later.
16. SRI - system of rice intensification. Double yields, reduces water requirements by 50% and reduces labor.
17. SRI for other crops: sugar cane, finger millet, cotton, wheat, mustard, maize, teff, pulses, vegetables.
18. Muscovies for insect control, meat, eggs; goats for meat and milk.
19. Bucket drip irrigation should be used during the dry season and in areas of low rainfall: Imported bucket drip kits are US$25 in most countries. A bucket drip line can be made locally from poly tubing [US$3, Nicaragua]. One will irrigate a row of crops 33 meters long using only 20 liters of water per day. A dripline can be moved to irrigate several rows per day. Water can be from a stream, pond or well. A drip kit returns US$20 per month to the farmer [FAO study].

A. ecopreservationsociety.org/site/index.php/the-news/sustainability/237--whats-wrong-with-our-food-system-ted-talk-by-birke-baehr [Subtitled in many languages]

I volunteer my time to teach workshops, worldwide, in English or Spanish. All expenses must be paid. Scheduled: Philippines.

Ken Hargesheimer minifarms@gmail.com

When Soil is Plowed
Dr. Elaine Ingham, describes an undisturbed grassland—where a wide diversity of plants grow, their roots mingling with a wide diversity of soil organisms—and how it changes when it is plowed.
A typical teaspoon of native grassland soil contains between 600 million and 800 million individual bacteria that are members of perhaps 10,000 species. Several miles of fungi are in that teaspoon of soil, as well as 10,000 individual protozoa. There are 20 to 30 beneficial nematodes from as many as 100 species. Root-feeding nematodes are quite scarce in truly healthy soils. They are present, but in numbers so low that it is rare to find them.
After only one plowing, a few species of bacteria and fungi disappear because the food they need is no longer put back in the system. But for the most part, all the suppressive organisms, all the nutrient cyclers, all the decomposers, all the soil organisms that rebuild good soil structure are still present and trying to do their jobs.
But tillage continues to deplete soil organic matter and kill fungi. The larger predators are crushed, their homes destroyed. The bacteria go through a bloom and blow off huge amounts of that savings-account organic matter. With continued tillage, the "policemen" (organisms) that compete with and inhibit disease are lost. The "architects" that build soil aggregates are lost. So are the "engineers"—the larger organisms that design and form the larger pores in soil. The predators that keep bacteria, fungi, and root-feeding organisms in check are lost. Disease suppression declines, soil structure erodes, and water infiltration decreases because mineral crusts form. Dr. Elaine Ingham, soilfoodweb.com
"Plowing the land over and over damages the soil almost as much as chemical weed killers do. It kills off nitrogen-fixing bacteria." Onmivore's Dilemma Plow to kill the weeds; that brings to the surface more seeds to sprout; more weeds to plow up.

Dear Ken,

Thank you for all the info. I am applying it in my own vegetable patch. It is working. Got half a pocket of potatoes off a square metre. So would imagine about 10 pounds per square yard. This off previously dead low, carbon soil. Sure next crop will be better. Got yams coming up on same spot already. Want to plant herbs and spices. I will send photos.

Your advise is so simple. People do not believe me when I tell them. I am so excited about growing things now. This coming from a commercial plum farmer. May you be blessed this holy season a thousand times more than you blessed me with you help. Jeremy Karsen, middagkrans@mwebbiz.co.za

We have already started several gardens in Jinkfuin community and the people working on them have benefitted from the DVDS we received from Ken. We watched the DVDs and got so many lessons and there women and men already running gardens, good ones! Lia, Kimilili
I confirm Ken's advice. I've been using mulch and no-till since the late sixties. It works. It really works. I now manage a 5,000 ft² community garden in its fifth season. It started on hard clay with turf grass using cardboard and mulch. Leaves are added to the beds every fall and it has never been tilled. It's a beautiful, fruitful garden. I have friends who have sand and advised them to do the same. They've been very successful as well. It will work anywhere. Judith Hainaut

Project room: Kyomya, Uganda
We have been working on improving farming techniques for almost a year. Unfortunately, the farmers are planting small plots of land that only feed their family. There is no other choice but to try new techniques to improve the output of their plot. Ken Hargesheimer suggested the "no till" farming techniques as well as the "drip system". Both have proven effective at increasing production by at least 5 fold. The time is now for Kyomya to become a model agricultural village. [nabuur.com]

Ken has instructed us that by introducing cover crops we will improve the organic nature of the soil. This involves less work than the previous method and has resulted in double the yield from crops where this method has been implemented.’
Busukuma, naburr.com

0