Help us find the dairy goat training for the community

Status: Finished
Step: 
2

This is the description of this task. The description will be shown as the first post of this task

Hi Diana, glad to see your first posting. Welcome on board.

Thank you for the contributions, the manual seems to be really good. I'm sure we could make a good one for the needs of Walungu. I'm attaching both this one and the one that Tanja found to the "resource" section.

I'm sure we'll manage to find training for the community. Let's try to find someone who could go there, start with the best and biggest organizations and projects towards smaller ones ... we have nothing to lose, the worst thing they can do is to refuse us.

Anyway, the second option is to send volunteers as I already said; Manu and Roger are ready to be trained. In that case, these links that Diana found would be very useful.
Here's another project that helps its beneficiaries with dairy goats training, in Uganda on the border with DRC, which shouldn't be far from Walungu.

Matiti Project-Goat milk project
http://www.whm.org/project?ID=12371
They train dairy goat keepers and provide veterinary assistance.

Take care,
Sonja

4
Average: 4 (1 vote)
4.5
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)

Great to see things moving forward.

I will try my best to be available for a chat today. I might be back a bit later than the usual so closer to the end of the afternoon in Africa and Europe. That might work better maybe.

Talk soon,

Raul

0

Just added 4 more potential organisations.

Let's keep on looking and adding more.

Raul

0

Found 2 more, which I added to the Wiki.
One of the organizations has religious ties. I'm not sure how people feel about that--just want to be sensitive to both the neighbours' and Walungu's religious sensibilitites.

0

Hi guys, thanks a lot for these contributions. Our list is really growing fast.

I added 2 more, partners of Heifer.

I think we should check with the community how they feel about religious organizations delivering training to them. I think that most of them are ok and are not insisting on preaching or so, but we should check if they are then maybe it would be better not to invite them... What do you think guys?

I talked to Guillaume and he thinks that we should also invite people from Uganda and Rwanda, they are close, but for the political reasons he thinks they wouldn't feel safe to go in the rural areas.
Guillaume believes it would be best to tell them that we invite them to come if they feel it's ok for them, something like that. But if they refuse maybe they could offer our volunteers to go there and be trained... Let's try.

Countries like Zambia, Kenya, Tanzania also have dairy goat projects and they could be close enough for the trainers to come to Walungu. Burundi is very close as well and I think we should also try with the org. that Diana found there.

Keep up good work,
Sonja

0

Hi everyone,

Hope you all have a nice weekend.

There's an NGO called JENGA having a dairy goat project in Uganda. They have offices in UK, Uganda and Australia. They have several projects like water supply, vocational training etc.

http://www.jengauganda.org/projects/

One of their supporters is Eddie Enright, a neighbour in Nabuur, who was also the part of the goat keeping project in Kakabada, the village in Nabuur. I emailed him some time ago, but did not managed to get in contact with him. I'll try to get in contact with him or some other team members of this project. Since Uganda is quite close to Walungu, maybe they could send some of international volunteers to train our community.

Best,
Sonja

0

Hi there,

Kyoko posted that in another forum, it may be helpful for our project...

Quote:

Kyoko wrote:

An English travel company, "i-to-i.com" promotes a variety of volunteer tours worldwide.
The founder of the company is a wonderful person who brought a business chance in Uganda. And the story was broadcasted by BBC. So I'm sure it is a very famous site among people who like volunteering.
If you wish to invite volunteers for long term, it would be a good channel for appealing to people, especially Europeans.
http://www.i-to-i.com/

0

Goodmorning all,
I met with Helmich van Rees. He is a trainer from PTC+ (Practical Training Centre). They have trained in the past more than 1600 pupils from 110 countries in livestock-keeping.
PTC has schools in several countries, all over the world, but not in Congo DRC. Helmich just returned from a training in Ghana. And he goes often to countries like Uganda and Ethiopia in order to train the local farmers
His first question to the groups is always: “What is your product and what is your goal’? In the case of Walungu: “Why goats”? I told him about the discussion we had , so far.“Who are your customers” ? etc,
About goats ( although not his speciality) he wondered , why we have chosen for dairygoats and not for meat. I know this is an ongoing discussion, but personally I agree with Trinto( bonjour Trinto, je suis heureux de vous voir dans notre communauté ) that if dairygoats go against the culture and the tradition of the local population, we should go for meatgoats. Pygmeegoats might be the best, as Anglo-Nubians might be stolen easely(because they are so expensive).
Helmich was in favour of starting a demofarm, but advised to keep it simple. With some keyfarmers who can explain to interested farmers from the region what we are trying to do and some products that can be sold. He warned that the people should choose a manager for the farm that they really can trust. Otherwise the profit of the farm goes in the pockets of the management and when the farmers need money for f.e. medicines for the animals, it can be very hard to get it back from the manager. Beware !
The fact that a lot of the local population might be illeterate, should not be a problem. People can be taught in practice how to keep goats. Another reason to start with a demofarm, is that by doing so, you reduce the risk for the poor farmers. Because they can see in practice, if their plan works.
He warned that the local climate might be too moist for goats and that they could be vulnerable for worminfections. With a simple cure that can be bought in local veterinary shops,you can save the life of especially the young goats. He suggested that each family should start with one male and two female goats. Rather this than artificial insemination, which is much too complicated.
If we start with meatgoats, then there are a lot of products that can be sold. But on the other hand you need a lot of qualityfood for the goats.
He suggested to build a stable(shed) for the goats, where they can be fed. Or otherwise a small roof, whereunder they can sleep during the night. You should not let the goats roam around, because they eat everything. Especially when you have crops around, they would eat all the harvest. It is better to keep them on a rope, with a stick in the ground.
Helmich is glad to see that the people of Walungu want to support themselves by this project, because he believes that there is too much money given by donors, which makes the people dependent.
He thinks that there is enough local expertise to train the farmers. But the organizations might not be so interested in our project, because it is so small. Maybe Fondamu (Trinto), you can be of help???
Nico

5
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Hi Nico,

Great to have you back.

Excellent comments as well.

it would be great if a male and two females could be given to each family. I am afraid it is still a matter of funding. Dairy goats also produce good meat so no problem there I guess.

Also agree to keep them in a shed or attached to a rope.

Great to hear the comments starting with the simple farm to learn the different practices.

Raul

0

Quote:

Nico Hammelburg wrote:
Goodmorning all,
I met with Helmich van Rees. He is a trainer from PTC+ (Practical Training Centre). They have trained in the past more than 1600 pupils from 110 countries in livestock-keeping.
PTC has schools in several countries, all over the world, but not in Congo DRC. Helmich just returned from a training in Ghana. And he goes often to countries like Uganda and Ethiopia in order to train the local farmers
His first question to the groups is always: “What is your product and what is your goal’? In the case of Walungu: “Why goats”? I told him about the discussion we had , so far.“Who are your customers” ? etc,
About goats ( although not his speciality) he wondered , why we have chosen for dairygoats and not for meat. I know this is an ongoing discussion, but personally I agree with Trinto( bonjour Trinto, je suis heureux de vous voir dans notre communauté ) that if dairygoats go against the culture and the tradition of the local population, we should go for meatgoats. Pygmeegoats might be the best, as Anglo-Nubians might be stolen easely(because they are so expensive).
Helmich was in favour of starting a demofarm, but advised to keep it simple. With some keyfarmers who can explain to interested farmers from the region what we are trying to do and some products that can be sold. He warned that the people should choose a manager for the farm that they really can trust. Otherwise the profit of the farm goes in the pockets of the management and when the farmers need money for f.e. medicines for the animals, it can be very hard to get it back from the manager. Beware !
The fact that a lot of the local population might be illeterate, should not be a problem. People can be taught in practice how to keep goats. Another reason to start with a demofarm, is that by doing so, you reduce the risk for the poor farmers. Because they can see in practice, if their plan works.
He warned that the local climate might be too moist for goats and that they could be vulnerable for worminfections. With a simple cure that can be bought in local veterinary shops,you can save the life of especially the young goats. He suggested that each family should start with one male and two female goats. Rather this than artificial insemination, which is much too complicated.
If we start with meatgoats, then there are a lot of products that can be sold. But on the other hand you need a lot of qualityfood for the goats.
He suggested to build a stable(shed) for the goats, where they can be fed. Or otherwise a small roof, whereunder they can sleep during the night. You should not let the goats roam around, because they eat everything. Especially when you have crops around, they would eat all the harvest. It is better to keep them on a rope, with a stick in the ground.
Helmich is glad to see that the people of Walungu want to support themselves by this project, because he believes that there is too much money given by donors, which makes the people dependent.
He thinks that there is enough local expertise to train the farmers. But the organizations might not be so interested in our project, because it is so small. Maybe Fondamu (Trinto), you can be of help???
Nico

Dear Nico...

I completely agree with what Helmich van Rees has told you here. I was reluctant to write my position as I have not yet seen the transcript of the chat you had a couple of days ago on this subject.

However I completely agree that: (a) meet goats are better as traditionally known and used than dairy goats for the culture of the Bashi who live in Walungu Territory; (b) it is always better to have a farm owned by an individual or a family that participate in the project than a model farm owned by a richer person; (c) fencing is OK, but people in Walungu use rope attached to sticks on one side and the goat on the other side for grazing; (d) Live fences that use plant fodder for goats would be excellent; (e) enriching some pastureland with good forage (grass or beans, nitrogen fixing plants...) would be excellent.

Hopefully this helps. Regards,

Trinto

0

Goodmorning all,
There is general consensus in development aid (and in Nabuur) that the people in underdeveloped countries are experts in their own problems and how to solve them. And that we in the West should follow them in this proces instead of imposing on them OUR way of thinking. In my opinion this also goes for Walungu. So if Trinto thinks (and he is a real expert) that meatgoats are better than dairygoats, than we should follow up on his advice.
Furtheron, I don't agree with you, Sonja, that it is too difficult for Guillaume to find out what the prices of goats are. I have been in Africa enough to know that in most (small) towns you will find cattle-markets and I am sure there is one in Walungu as well.
What worries me most is the funding of our project. Foodprices have risen immensely. So I think that it will not be possible for the farmers of Walungu to invest the money of the harvest in the demofarm. I feel they need every penny for food, health and education. What do you all think about this?
So what we need, as soon as possible, is a definite projectplan with a budget. Tanja, you are an excellent researcher and by the nature of your work, I am sure that you are used to write projectplans, could you give it a try ? I am willing to help.
To conclude: we should not be driven by deadlines, but by good ideas and planning.
Be well,
Nico

0

Nico,

I agree with your worries about the food prices. I actually mentioned in the chat the other day that I am worried that the locals will spend the money on something else, because that can not afford to wait on us to make up our minds. I was not able to find reliable pricing data for goats online ( may be because there is no much e- commerce in DRC). Regarding the type of goats- I don't know what to say. I truly believe that dairy goats are a good idea because they provide a constant (although limited) source of protein. But it is all up to the local community.They should decide what is the higher priority. Based on our discussions I had the impression that the locals (everybody but Trinto) wanted dairy goats...

All the best,
Tanja

0

Hi Nico,

We already have the funding for the learning farm (private funding from an anonimous source for 1 dairy male goat, and two female local goats to have a crossbreed that will produce both meat and milk) and even if from the harvest there is enough money for 2 or 3 goats that will be enough to continue growing the project. Small steps for development. As soon as we learn more from the learning farm we will analyse more about the requirements. The community has decided they want to have an improved breed and I feel that is the way we should go.

The community has also spokend about the construction of sheds with local materials and they are eager to start learning with the learning farm. They wil not invest money on it so what ever happens is a gain and the money from the harvest would be better invested.

Hope this helps,

Raul

0